The Graduate Job Epidemic

I have to say I am quite disappointed at how we as a society are helping our grads get job ready.  Not enough is being done and students are bombing out for simple things.  Missing out on a great job is disappointing but when you are so young and vulnerable it is worse.

A great example we can learn from (now hear me out) is the of ‘job networks’.  These services support those who are disadvantaged in some way.  I have worked with many job networks to place people and I must say they don’t get the credit they deserve.  They really do help get them ready and I’ve placed many a good candidate using this service.  Shout out to those who I use!  Some of the talent I gained have been excellent.  But this service was set up due to our perception of those who have been unemployed or suffered in some way and this still needs to change (I’ll write on that later).

Just like grads though we are facing an epidemic.  Young adults who have spent a lot of money to study and get a good career.  We push them onto the street and expect them to find their way into the job market.  The job market has changed significantly over the past 12 months and is is very complex.

The way organisations recruit has changed – some opting for experience over study.  This is where we all can make a change.

Organisations – I challenge you to look inside your organisation to find candidates doing casual or a simple part time job.  Are you looking inside first for talent?  I do and have had much success not just from a graduate point of view but succession planning.

Graduates – I challenge you to look at the company you are in – speak to HR about when you will graduate and what you will be looking for.  You’ll (hopefully) be surprised.  It might be staring you in the face!

Universitys – I challenge you to get your careers team up with the times.  Get them engaged in industry and looking forward not just in the ‘now’.  I’m not saying by any means that you don’t do a good job but being institutionalised doesn’t help.

Some universitys I’ve worked with through past roles do it much better than others and it creates a point of different when engaging new students.

My fear, however is if we don’t do something NOW, we will have a well educated population with no work.  What affect will this have on the economy – we’ll lose them overseas, they’ll get into jobs that don’t use their full capacity or worse – fall on the employment heap.

I will be preparing a ‘job ready’ presentation with a great university next week.  I’m looking forward to using my knowledge to help students on the right path!

When Does Equality Become Inequity?

The Bare Consultant

With such great movements towards equality in workplaces; I’ve always been curious about the hidden dynamics.  By this I mean – what do companies really do (under the surface) to achieve equality and this authentic?

Larger organisations now have set targets to meet on diversity and most of it sits around gender.  This is only one small part of diversity.  Only the statistics and results are seen in the public eye.  These are often seen in reporting or through and Talent Attraction Campaigns.

Little is known about how organisations achieve this.  Behind the scenes are people in recruitment, talent management, leadership and HR who work tirelessly to ensure the organisation complies.  How do they achieve this difficult task?

Recruitment

I’ve asked a number of colleagues who work in recruitment (particularly in the banking sector) and was horrified.  One colleague said that for every three resume’s they presented to stakeholders, there…

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When Does Equality Become Inequity?

With such great movements towards equality in workplaces; I’ve always been curious about the hidden dynamics.  By this I mean – what do companies really do (under the surface) to achieve equality and this authentic?

Larger organisations now have set targets to meet on diversity and most of it sits around gender.  This is only one small part of diversity.  Only the statistics and results are seen in the public eye.  These are often seen in reporting or through and Talent Attraction Campaigns.

Little is known about how organisations achieve this.  Behind the scenes are people in recruitment, talent management, leadership and HR who work tirelessly to ensure the organisation complies.  How do they achieve this difficult task?

Recruitment

I’ve asked a number of colleagues who work in recruitment (particularly in the banking sector) and was horrified.  One colleague said that for every three resume’s they presented to stakeholders, there must be at least one female represented (this is not what horrified me!).  This horrified me!  The focus was not on whether the female had the experience and qualifications for the role but was simply a ‘token’ candidate.  This meant that the recruitment team could report accurately that they had put forward a female candidate to the role.

This has many levels of ‘wrongness’ .  The poor female candidate goes for a job interview and is clearly not right for the role.  How does this leave her feeling?  What about the time she wasted, the time the recruitment team wasted and the interviewer!  Simply so the organisation can report they have interviewed so many females for the role.

I too have been asked to apply for a senior role as the company only wanted a female.  Not only was I under qualified but I didn’t want to take a role where an organisation thought that male and female ratios meant diversity.

Internal Promotions

I’ve also seen males less qualified and experienced get internal promotions over other more qualified females to meet the targets of a female dominated industry.  I’ve also witnessed a female who was extremely under qualified get promoted into a senior role over a male (who was doing the role and very successfully).

Diversity is so much more than gender.  If we are going to focus on gender as a way to quantify that we are ‘good’ organisations – this is alarming.  Male or Female – we should not be put up as a statistic to prove we are equal.  In fact I think looking simply at gender is inequality.

Some organisations do diversity really well and I know why.  They don’t have to report on male/female ratios or prove anything.  The simple mantra is ‘the right person for the job’.  One such organisation a great mix of male/female/transgender/gay/bisexual/people with disabilities/marginalised people and much more.

Diversity of thought is the key and the ‘best person for the job’ regardless is real diversity.

Hiring Sales Managers In Retail

Any multi-store retailer would agree that having a competent district manager is critical to success. Tasked with overseeing the operations of all stores within a given district or area, a district manager needs to juggle several retail components, including staff development, compliance, sales, customer satisfaction, and more. Needless to say, the individual that you hire […]

via 6 Tips for Hiring a Retail District Manager — Retail Audit and Store Execution Blog